Edit ModuleShow Tags
Published:

Kitchen Hack: Magically Extend Shelf-Life of Leafy Greens



Kitchen Hack: Magically Extend Shelf-Life of Leafy Greens | Food and Nutrition Magazine

Leafy greens are delicious and nutritious, but there is one major problem: They often spoil too quickly. If leafy greens are sold in a large bag or box, they can become wilted and slimy by the time you make a dent in the package.

Wasting food is a serious problem in the United States, so use this kitchen hack to extend the shelf-life of all greens from arugula to spinach.  You will help the environment by reducing food waste and save money on your grocery bill.

How to extend shelf-life of leafy greens:

  • After opening the package, place a dry paper towel in the bag or on top of the salad greens. The paper towel will absorb some of the moisture, noticeably extending the shelf-life of the leafy greens.
  • Wash leafy greens before using, not before storing. If you wash leafy greens before storing, you can potentially promote bacterial growth and enhance spoilage. 
  • Store the greens in a refrigerator that is at or below 40°F for three to seven days.
Edit Module

More Stone Soup

Show Your Support for Farmers' Markets

Show Your Support for Farmers' Markets

Business is booming all across the country, with more than 8,100 markets counted as of 2013.
4 FAQs for Meatless Mondays

4 FAQs for Meatless Mondays

Thinking of going meatless — or at least reducing your consumption of animal-based foods? Here are two reasons to try: your health and the planet's health.
They're Not All Bad: Healthy Carbs to Try in 2015

They're Not All Bad: Healthy Carbs to Try in 2015

Glucose, which is the building block for carbs, is the main source of energy for the brain and many other vital organs in the body.
Effective Ways to Promote Real Food (Especially to Kids)

Effective Ways to Promote Real Food (Especially to Kids)

So many people, far too many people, still don’t get it. What you eat matters — to the environment and planet and to the future of our country.
Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module
Advertise with Food & Nutrition
Edit ModuleShow TagsEdit ModuleShow Tags


Stone Soup

Guest bloggers from around the world share with Food & Nutrition Magazine.

About This Blog

Stone Soup is a guest blog written by members of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Content — including information, recipes and views expressed — is that of the authors and does not reflect the positions or policies of Food & Nutrition Magazine or the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Bloggers are required to pledge they will not write for Stone Soup on topics, companies or trade organization they currently represent or have represented at any time.

Learn about our guest blogs!

Comments Policy

Food & Nutrition Magazine provides this forum to exchange ideas, opinions and contributions within a positive community. Diverse viewpoints and constructive, respectful dialogue are welcome. Rudeness, misinformation, self-promotion and abuse are not. We reserve the right, without warning or notification, to remove comments and block users we determine violate this policy or our Terms & Conditions. You must include your name or be logged into a personal account on Disqus, Facebook, Twitter or Google+ to comment.

Archives

Edit Module

Get Stone Soup in Your RSS

Use your RSS reader's instructions to add Stone Soup to your list:

Atom Feed Subscribe to the Stone Soup Feed »

Get Our Blogs in Your Email

Stone Soup
Student Scoop